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A Guide to College and University for Students with Psychiatric Disabilities

Your Education Your Future

Attending college or university opens up an exciting world of possibilities. It can also be pretty challenging. But if you’re living with a mental illness, you’ve faced challenges before. This resource is designed to make your transition to college or university just a little bit easier. It takes you through all the steps of going to school, providing information and tips for anyone living with a mental illness.

Download the full guide as a PDF or visit www.cmha.ca/youreducation/.

A Sibling’s Guide to Psychosis: Information, Ideas and ResourcesAs part of a national project to raise awareness about first-episode psychosis and support the needs of families affected by the illness, the Canadian Mental Health Association has developed this sibling resource guide – a guide intended to provide information and support to teens and young adults who have a brother or sister experiencing psychosis.

Anxiety DisordersWe all feel nervous or worried at times. This anxiety can be a helpful feeling when it motivates us or warns us of danger. An anxiety disorder, on the other hand, causes unexpected or unhelpful anxiety that seriously impacts our lives, including how we think, feel, and act.

Children, youth, and depressionWhile we may think of low mood or other challenges as adult problems, they can affect people at any age. Children and teens can experience mental illnesses like depression. Sometimes it can be difficult for adults to understand how difficult children’s problems can be because we look at their problems through adult eyes. But the pressures of growing up can be very hard for some children. It’s important that we remind ourselves that while their problems may seem unimportant to us, they can feel overwhelming to young people. It’s important to take depression in young people seriously.

Depression and Bipolar DisorderWe all experience changes in our mood. Sometimes we feel energetic, full of ideas, or irritable, and other times we feel sad or down. But these moods usually don’t last long, and we can go about our daily lives. Depression and bipolar disorder are two mental illnesses that change the way people feel and make it hard for them to go about their daily routine.

Eating DisordersEvery day, we are surrounded by different messages from different sources that impact the way we feel about the way we look. For some, poor body image is a sign of a serious problem: an eating disorder. Eating disorders are not just about food. They are often a way to cope with difficult problems or regain a sense of control. They are complicated illnesses that affect a person’s sense of identity, worth, and self-esteem.

Feeling AngryWe all feel angry sometimes. Most of the time, we can deal with feelings of anger or irritability quickly. We may resolve the situation or look at the problem from a different perspective. However, anger can cause problems in our lives and the lives of those around us. Learn more about recognizing problem anger and taking action.

Getting HelpSome people worry about asking for help because there can be stigma around mental health problems. They may believe that asking for help means admitting that something is wrong. Some people worry about how others might see them. Asking for help means that you want to make changes or take steps towards your new health goals. We should celebrate the courage it takes to speak up and make changes. Getting help is part of recovery.

GrievingLoss is one of life’s most stressful events. It takes time to heal, and everyone responds differently. We may need help to cope with the changes in our lives. Grief is part of being human, but that doesn’t mean we have to go through the journey alone.

Hangin’ in There: Strategies for Job Retention by Persons with a Psychiatric DisabilityThis booklet is written primarily for people with psychiatric disabilities and it reflects their personal view points on the subject of job retention.

 

Mental Fitness Tips

Think about your emotional well-being. Assess your emotional health regularly. Consider the particular demands or stresses you are facing and how they are affecting you. Give yourself permission to take a break from your worries and concerns. Recognize that dedicating even a short time every day to your mental fitness will reap significant benefits in terms of feeling rejuvenated and more confident.

Mental Health and High School Curriculum Guide

Mental Health and High School Curriculum

School-aged youth are a vulnerable population. They are in a period their lives that is crucial in their mental health development. Canadian youth spend more time in school than anywhere else outside the home. Schools are often challenged to deal with youth mental health, but are seriously under equipped and inadequately supported to handle this responsibility.

The curriculum guide provides a complete set of educational tools to increase understanding of mental health and mental disorders among both students and teachers.

To purchase the guide, visit teenmentalhealth.org.

Mental Health for LifeMental health is key to our well-being. We can’t be truly healthy without it. It involves how we feel, think, act, and interact with the world around us. Mental health is about realizing our potential, coping with the normal stresses of life, and making a contribution to our community. It may be more helpful to think of good mental health as thriving. Good mental health isn’t about avoiding problems or trying to achieve a ‘perfect’ life. It’s about living well and feeling capable despite challenges. Mental well-being is bigger than the presence or absence of a mental illness. People who live with a mental illness can and do thrive, just as people without a mental illness may experience poor mental health.

Mental Health Promotion ToolkitThe Mental Health Promotion Toolkit, produced in 1999, is a comprehensive guide for communities that wish to undertake mental health promotion initiatives. It contains everything anyone would need to know about implementing a mental health promotion program, including examples, strategies, tips and tools.

Mental Health Promotion Train-the-Trainers ManualThe Train the Trainer manual is a companion resource to the Mental Health Promotion Tool Kit. Exercises allow participants to learn skills for carrying out the various components of a community development program as outlined in the Took Kit. 2003 Edition.

Mental IllnessWhat do you think of when you hear that someone is experiencing a mental illness? Some people feel concern, fear, or confusion. Some even avoid those who experience mental illnesses. But mental illnesses are just like any other illness: everyone deserves care, help, and support.

Mental Illness in the WorkplaceFor people experiencing a mental illness, a good work/life balance is critical. The relationship between stress and mental illness is complex, but certainly stress can exacerbate mental illness for some people. In fact, according to Statistics Canada, employees who considered most of their days to be quite a bit or extremely stressful were over 3 times more likely to suffer a major depressive episode, compared with those who reported low levels of general stress.

Mental Illnesses in the WorkplaceWork is important to our well-being. In addition to the income it brings, it can be a big part of our identity, how we understand our skills, and a way to contribute to something bigger. However, a mental illness can have a big impact on the way we work.

 

Myths About Mental IllnessMental illnesses affect everyone in some way. We all likely know someone who has experienced a mental illness at some point. Yet there are still many hurtful attitudes around mental illnesses that fuel stigma and discrimination and make it harder to reach out for help. It’s time to look at the facts.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Many of us have small habits that make us feel better, but we can also live without them. For example, we might think of something as ‘lucky’ or have a routine that feels comforting. But for people who experience obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), these behaviours are much more intense and disruptive and are fuelled by unwanted thoughts that don’t go away. Obsessive-compulsive disorder is not always easy to understand, but it’s a real illness that causes difficulties in a person’s life.